Italy

The Ancient Oracles : Sibyls, Pythias, and Prophecy

The Ancient Oracles : Sibyls, Pythias, and Prophecy

The ancient oracles were the priestesses and mystics that served their community by entering trance states to communicate with the gods and goddesses of Greece and Rome as well as many other regions in the Mediterranean, North Africa, and Southwest Asia. They had many names but often held the titles of “Sibyl” and “Pythia.”

Contact and communication with the divine has been a primary aspect of human spiritual practices from ancient times to the present. The various methods of communication/communion have long been known as divination.  The word “divination” is derived from the Latin divinare, “to be inspired by god”,  and divinus, “of a god.” Divination is basically the cultural practices of humans that allow us to communicate with the divine and acquire knowledge of the unseen, archetypal, and omnipotent past, present, and future energies that are influencing our daily lives as well as our fate and destiny.


Divination, to the ancients, and to many of us today, is a healing tradition that aligns humans both individually and collectively with the words and will of the sacred forces that intersect our physical realm.  Divination is a medicine that comes from what some may know as gods and goddesses or as others may know as the universal currents and unseen spirits of nature and the Otherworld as they exist in dynamic exchange with living matter. The methods of divination have changed, and continue to change, through time. Based on my own research and direct experience I have surmised that, as people became more civilized/human-centered and therefore more disconnected from natural rhythms, they required more complicated and ritualized forms of contacting the spiritual energies of the Earth (otherwise known as Gods and Goddesses).

The Mermaid's Daughter

The Mermaid's Daughter

This June I’ll be taking a return pilgrimage to my ancestral homeland of Italy. I am currently preparing for it by spending time in deep study and listening with my family lineage and ancestry. My grandparents were Italian immigrants and my relationship with them has had a profound impact on the shaping of who I am. I grew up in an immigrant and refugee community in the city of Utica, NY. My neighborhood, during the 1970’s and 80’s, consisted of mainly 1st and 2nd generation Italian, Polish, Puerto Rican, Lebanese, some German, and Vietnamese immigrants. I really didn’t understand or consider my neighborhood an “immigrant community” at the time, however. I just thought we were all Americans. This was my America; the statue of liberty took us in, “America is made of immigrants, a melting pot”, a place of refuge from famine, fascism, war, and colonization. My mother is 2nd generation Irish and she still carries An Gorta Mór/The Great Hunger in her belly, as do I.

Basilico~Sweet Basil Magick

Basilico~Sweet Basil Magick

“Where Basil grows, no evil goes” ~Old Adage

“Make sure and add some basilico!” Was a common phrase in the kitchen on Sunday at my grandparent’s house when I was growing up. Basilico is the Italian word for Basil. Whenever someone came to visit in the summer they would ask, “How’s your garden this year?” This meant, “Give me a garden tour so I can make sure you’ve planted your tomatoes and to see if they look as good as mine.”

After a thorough tomato inspection the next question was, “Where is your basilico?!” My Italian family members always wanted to see the garden, and the elders, specifically my grandfather and great-uncles, were always adamant about seeing the garden and inspecting the contents. Everyone grew some traditional Italian food even if it was just a couple of tomato plants growing in pots on the front porch. Even when my grandparents moved to the Adirondack Mountains, where the soil is sand and rock, they turned and  toiled the land next to their little cabin enriching the soil and installing deer fences so they could plant basil and tomatoes. 

Growing tomatoes, basil, and parsley was part of honoring and respecting my family and our Italian heritage.